fbpx
Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

Mind the Gap

Along with the shift towards quick results, there is an ever-widening gap between what practitioners advocate, what the media portrays and what the legal system regards as acceptable conduct in the context of self-defence. I would like to share my views on this topic. 

Published in Martial Arts
Sunday, 18 May 2014 00:00

A Breakdown of Reality

By which I mean a breakdown of the elements of that now-notorious phrase, 'reality-based self-defence'. 

Tuesday, 29 April 2014 00:00

Schooled - What are you looking for?

Martial arts are a beautiful thing, with deep roots in tradition and positive values. 

But, just like most other things in today’s world, martial arts are strongly influenced by fads, buzzwords, and fashion. This has both pros and cons. 

Monday, 10 March 2014 00:00

DIEP - Learning Martial Arts Through Reflection

Self-reflection has long been recognised as one of the critical components in self-development, critical thinking and goal setting in high achievers. From the samurai to boxing, BJJ and MMA champions, from entrepreneurs to Fortune 500 CEOs, reflecting on one’s actions is the fastest and most effective way to maximise your training. Want to know how to do this effectively

Sunday, 16 February 2014 12:59

Sidelined, Not Sidetracked

Scenario: You were sparring, or pushed yourself too hard in training. You got injured. You then go and see the physiotherapist or the doctor. They diagnose you with – insert your favourite injury here – and tell you to take X weeks off training. We all know the butterflies in the stomach, dry mouth and horrible thoughts racing through your mind waiting for the examination to finish and the verdict be given to (FYI - this is also a form of adrenal dump). At which point, you are left with two choices:

The first is that you take a couple of days off, use RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression Elevation) for a couple of days and then shrug it off and go back to training even though you are not at 100%. Most people I have trained with have done this before, usually leads to recurring injuries within a short time that will force you out for even longer than first anticipated.

The second option is that you listen to your doctor and take time off. This also means your skills may deteriorate a little bit, your cardio capacity will diminish and your monthly fee will go to waste. Also, you will have to deal with the psychological effects of not training or doing physical exercise for a while – anything from boredom to anxiety to depression to lethargy - which can be even more furstrating than the physical symptoms, particularly to those who train very often.

 What do you do?

Page 2 of 2

Message CAIA

enter email 
phone 
your name 
message 
Sign Me Up! 
  signup  
Please enter the following tosrzicu Help us prevent SPAM!
    

Quick Links

• HOME
• KRAV MAGA
• KICKBOXING
• BOXING
• JMA | FMA
• TIMETABLE
• Book Classes | Shop
• JOIN US
• CONTACT

Privacy
Values
Code of Conduct

Copyright © Combat Arts Institute of Australia
341 Oxford Street, Leederville Perth WA 6007 [map]
Ring us on 08 9389 9489

Kedela wer kalyakoorl ngalak Wadjak boodjak yaak.
Today and always, we stand on the traditional land of the Whadjuk Noongar people.

fbbn instabn ytbn